社会与文化

ADJUSTING TO LIFE IN AUSTRALIA

While living, and studying abroad may be an exciting adventure, it can also present a range of challenges. Having decided to study and live in Australia you will be undertaking adjustments in many areas of your life including cultural, social and academic. It is also important to remember that while these changes are occurring you will be embarking upon a new semester of study (for many of you in a different language) and be away from your usual supports, networks and resources. Adjustment to a new country and culture is a process that occurs gradually and takes time. The values, beliefs, traditions and customs of your home country may vary greatly from those in Australia and adapting to the Australian way of life may take some time.

DURING A STORM


There are some things you can do to stay safe:

  • Stay indoors and away from windows.
  • Unplug sensitive electrical devices like computers, televisions and video recorders.
  • Listen to your radio for weather updates.
  • Don’t use a landline telephone during an electrical storm (Source: NSW SES)




IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE DURING A STORM


  • Get inside a vehicle or building if possible.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down, with your feet close together and head tucked in.
  • If in a group – spread out, keeping people several metres apart.
  • Don’t try to drive through flood waters.Floodwater may be deeper and faster flowing than it appears and often contains hidden dangersand debris. (Source: NSW SES Floodsafe)





CULTURE SHOCK

Culture shock is the feeling of being out of place in an unfamiliar environment. The initial excitement of moving to a new country often subsides when different cultural expectations challenge you to attend to daily responses and behaviours previously taken for granted. The potential stress of dealing with these persistent challenges can result in feelings of hostility and frustration with your host country as well as a profound longing for home.

OVERCOMING CULTURE SHOCK


Once you realise you have culture shock, getting over it and moving on to better adjustment with the host culture will depend on you. It is you who must take some positive steps to feel better, and the sooner you take them, the better!

  1. Recognition: First, you should remember that culture shock is a normal part of your adjustment and that you may have some of the symptoms. Some of your reactions may not be normal for you; you may be more emotional or more sensitive, or lose your sense of humour. Recognising your culture shock symptoms will help you learn about yourself as you work your way through it.
  2. Be objective: Second, try to analyse objectively the differences you are finding between your home and your host country. Look for the reasons your host country does things differently. Remember that host customs and norms are (mostly) logical to them, just as your customs and norms at home are logical to you!
  3. Set goals: Third, set some goals for yourself to redevelop your feeling of control in your life. These should be small tasks that you can accomplish each day. For example, if you do not feel like leaving your room, plan a short activity each day that will get you out. Go to a post office or store to buy something, ride a bus or go to a sports event. If you feel that language is your problem, set daily goals to learn more: study fifteen minutes a day; learn five new words a day; learn one new expression each day; watch a TV program in your new language for 30 minutes. Each goal that you achieve will give you more and more self-confidence that you can cope.
  4. Share your feelings: Fourth, find local friends who are sympathetic and understanding. Talk to them about your feelings and specific situations. They can help you understand ideas from their cultural point of view.

(Source: Rotary International Youth Exchange)





AUSTRALIAN CULTURE

What are the drones that are compatible with the LIFELINE?


The LIFELINE is currently compatible with the DJI Phantom 4 Series Version 1 & 2, the Mavic Pro, Mavic 2 Pro, Zoom & Enterprise, Inspire 1 and Inspire 2. If you plan to use a different drone, please send us an email with your drone specs and we will be happy to advise you.




Is there low battery warning on for the LIFELINE?


Yes there is! Upon reaching a pre-defined threshold, the Onboard Battery Monitoring System automatically triggers a battery alarm. Upon hearing the alarm, the operator has up to 3 minutes of additional flight time (Phantom 4) to execute a safe landing.




What is the maximum wind speed that the drone can operate?


This will depend on the drone type and payload attached. Do check with DJI and/or your drone manufacturer on the performance threshold.

Typically, we do not recommend operating in wind speeds above 8 m/s.




Can the drone reach 60M and beyond?


The total cable length is 60m. That is the maximum reccommended length if you intend to use the LIFELINE with DJI Phantom or Mavic series drones. Longer cable is available on request and customisation for other drones.




Is a tethered drone subjected to drone regulations?


This will depends on the country you operate in. In some countries, a tethered drone is not classified as a drone because it is physically secured to an anchor point and it cannot fly freely. In other countries, the tethered drone is subjected to regulations similar but less restrictive than a conventional UAV. In Singapore, the LIFELINE-S is approved by the Civil Aviation Authorities of Singapore (CAAS). Please refer to the civil aviation laws of your country for compliance with the local regulations.




What is the order processing and shipping time?


The order processing time may take up to 8 weeks, depending on the stock levels. We ship via DHL air freight so the shipping time is according to their estimation.




What is the warranty period & conditions?


The Warranty Period for Physical Goods purchased from Skyshot Pte Ltd is 6 months from the date of purchase. To find out more, please refer to this warranty document.




Can the LIFELINE work longer with a generator or AC?


Yes, LIFELINE is made to be modular. You can purchase a separate AC adapter module to replace the battery module in the LIFELINE.




What is the weight & maximum stress load for the tether line?


At 60 meters length, the tether line weighs 450 grams. The maximum stress load is more than 20 kg.




How do I monitor the flight height?


You can monitor the flight altitude from the DJI Go 4 app.




Can it operate in light rain?


Do not operate the lifeline in wet conditions. There is a risk of lightning strike on the drone which can be fatal for the operator.




What is the Tension settings on the Lifeline-S?


The tension of the retract is determined and fixed by OEM according to specific aircraft intended.





PUBLIC HOLIDAYS & SPECIAL CELEBRATIONS

Australians hold certain days each year as special days of national meaning. We may recognise the day with a holiday for everyone or we can celebrate the day as a nation with special events. Most States and Territories observe some of the public holidays on the same date. They have others on different dates or have some days that only their State or Territory celebrates. In larger cities, most shops, restaurants and public transport continue to operate on public holidays. In smaller towns, most shops and restaurants close.

ANIMALS IN THEIR NATURAL HABITAT


Be wary of animals in their natural habitat. Stay well back from goannas, crocodiles, snakes, dingoes, cassowaries, and also wild pigs, cattle, horses and buffaloes. People have been seriously injured or killed by wild animals. Be very careful about approaching any injured animal, such as kangaroos or possums. They are likely to bite and scratch if you attempt to touch or move them.




NEVER FEED OR PLAY WITH WILDLIFE


Never feed or play with wildlife. Native animals are by nature timid; however, having been provided food from people, may become aggressive in pursuit of food. You may get bitten or scratched. In addition, human foods may be harmful to native animals.




TROPICAL QUEENSLAND


In the warm waters of Tropical Queensland:

  • Take care to avoid marine stingers.
  • Do not enter water where crocodiles may live.




BITES AND STINGS


The majority of insects in Australia are not harmful to humans. Some insects bite and sting if they are threatened so it is best to avoid touching them if you want to avoid being stung or bitten. The Australia-wide Poisons Information Centre’s have a common telephone number: 131 126. Some people are allergic to certain insect bites or venom. In the case of an allergic reaction to bites or stings, medical attention should be sought immediately. Call a doctor or hospital for guidance, or 000.




ANAPHYLAXIS - ALLERGIC REACTIONS


Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can occur in sensitive individuals from exposure to any chemicals foreign to the body, including bites and stings, plants, or medications. Parts of the body, for example the face or throat swell up so much that the patient can’t breathe. In severe cases the patient may go into shock within a few minutes and the heart can stop. For any patient who shows signs of anaphylaxis, call 000 for an ambulance, and have the patient taken immediately to the emergency department of the nearest hospital.




GENERAL FIRST AID FOR BITES AND STINGS


For bites or stings from these creatures seek first aid assistance straight away, stay calm, and as immobile as possible.

  • all species of Australian snakes, including sea snakes
  • funnel web spiders
  • blue ringed octopus
  • cone shell stings


For all other bites and stings:

  • Seek or apply basic first aid.
  • Wash with soap and water and apply an antiseptic if available
  • Ensure that the patient’s tetanus vaccination is up to date
  • Apply an ice-pack to reduce local pain and swelling
  • Pain relief may be required e.g. paracetamol or an antihistamine (to reduce swelling, redness and itch)
  • The patient should seek medical advice if they develop any other symptoms or signs of infection.
  • Poisons Info





HOME FIRE SAFETY

International students are increasingly appearing in statistics related to fire incidents and deaths in Australia. Sadly, most of these fires are preventable. You can take some simple steps to reduce the risk of fire in your accommodation. Follow the fire safety tips below to help you reduce the chance of fire in your accommodation.

DURING A STORM


There are some things you can do to stay safe:

  • Stay indoors and away from windows.
  • Unplug sensitive electrical devices like computers, televisions and video recorders.
  • Listen to your radio for weather updates.
  • Don’t use a landline telephone during an electrical storm (Source: NSW SES)




IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE DURING A STORM


  • Get inside a vehicle or building if possible.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down, with your feet close together and head tucked in.
  • If in a group – spread out, keeping people several metres apart.
  • Don’t try to drive through flood waters.Floodwater may be deeper and faster flowing than it appears and often contains hidden dangersand debris. (Source: NSW SES Floodsafe)





SUN SAFETY

Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world. In fact, one in every two Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer at some point during their lifetime. The good news is, it can be prevented.  By minimising your exposure to the sun’s damaging ultraviolet radiation (UVR), you can protect your skin and prevent the development of skin cancer.

OVERCOMING CULTURE SHOCK


Once you realise you have culture shock, getting over it and moving on to better adjustment with the host culture will depend on you. It is you who must take some positive steps to feel better, and the sooner you take them, the better!

  1. Recognition: First, you should remember that culture shock is a normal part of your adjustment and that you may have some of the symptoms. Some of your reactions may not be normal for you; you may be more emotional or more sensitive, or lose your sense of humour. Recognising your culture shock symptoms will help you learn about yourself as you work your way through it.
  2. Be objective: Second, try to analyse objectively the differences you are finding between your home and your host country. Look for the reasons your host country does things differently. Remember that host customs and norms are (mostly) logical to them, just as your customs and norms at home are logical to you!
  3. Set goals: Third, set some goals for yourself to redevelop your feeling of control in your life. These should be small tasks that you can accomplish each day. For example, if you do not feel like leaving your room, plan a short activity each day that will get you out. Go to a post office or store to buy something, ride a bus or go to a sports event. If you feel that language is your problem, set daily goals to learn more: study fifteen minutes a day; learn five new words a day; learn one new expression each day; watch a TV program in your new language for 30 minutes. Each goal that you achieve will give you more and more self-confidence that you can cope.
  4. Share your feelings: Fourth, find local friends who are sympathetic and understanding. Talk to them about your feelings and specific situations. They can help you understand ideas from their cultural point of view.

(Source: Rotary International Youth Exchange)





BEACH SAFETY

Understanding the ocean is very important – the more you know about how waves, wind and tides affect conditions in the water, the better able you are to keep yourself safe, or even rescue others, from danger. Recognising danger signs and awareness of surf conditions is an essential part of lifesaving.

OVERCOMING CULTURE SHOCK


Once you realise you have culture shock, getting over it and moving on to better adjustment with the host culture will depend on you. It is you who must take some positive steps to feel better, and the sooner you take them, the better!

  1. Recognition: First, you should remember that culture shock is a normal part of your adjustment and that you may have some of the symptoms. Some of your reactions may not be normal for you; you may be more emotional or more sensitive, or lose your sense of humour. Recognising your culture shock symptoms will help you learn about yourself as you work your way through it.
  2. Be objective: Second, try to analyse objectively the differences you are finding between your home and your host country. Look for the reasons your host country does things differently. Remember that host customs and norms are (mostly) logical to them, just as your customs and norms at home are logical to you!
  3. Set goals: Third, set some goals for yourself to redevelop your feeling of control in your life. These should be small tasks that you can accomplish each day. For example, if you do not feel like leaving your room, plan a short activity each day that will get you out. Go to a post office or store to buy something, ride a bus or go to a sports event. If you feel that language is your problem, set daily goals to learn more: study fifteen minutes a day; learn five new words a day; learn one new expression each day; watch a TV program in your new language for 30 minutes. Each goal that you achieve will give you more and more self-confidence that you can cope.
  4. Share your feelings: Fourth, find local friends who are sympathetic and understanding. Talk to them about your feelings and specific situations. They can help you understand ideas from their cultural point of view.

(Source: Rotary International Youth Exchange)





BUSH & OUTBACK SAFETY

Australia has many extraordinary and beautiful places to explore. If you are going on a trip, travel with other people, make sure someone knows where you are at all times and stay on a road or a walking track.

DURING A STORM


There are some things you can do to stay safe:

  • Stay indoors and away from windows.
  • Unplug sensitive electrical devices like computers, televisions and video recorders.
  • Listen to your radio for weather updates.
  • Don’t use a landline telephone during an electrical storm (Source: NSW SES)




IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE DURING A STORM


  • Get inside a vehicle or building if possible.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down, with your feet close together and head tucked in.
  • If in a group – spread out, keeping people several metres apart.
  • Don’t try to drive through flood waters.Floodwater may be deeper and faster flowing than it appears and often contains hidden dangersand debris. (Source: NSW SES Floodsafe)





STORM SAFETY

Storms can happen anywhere and at any time of the year. Storms are more common during storm season – from October to the end of April, but it is important to be aware all year round. Severe storms can cause major damage. They may be accompanied by torrential rain, strong winds, large hailstones, loud thunder and lightning. Storms can cause flash flooding, un-roof buildings, and damage trees and powerlines. You can also be indirectly affected by storms even if your property is not damaged; such as losing power, or access roads being cut. The SES is responsible for managing the clean-up and helping people during and after a storm. For emergency assistance in floods and storms, call the NSW SES on 132 500

DURING A STORM


There are some things you can do to stay safe:

  • Stay indoors and away from windows.
  • Unplug sensitive electrical devices like computers, televisions and video recorders.
  • Listen to your radio for weather updates.
  • Don’t use a landline telephone during an electrical storm (Source: NSW SES)




IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE DURING A STORM


  • Get inside a vehicle or building if possible.
  • If no shelter is available, crouch down, with your feet close together and head tucked in.
  • If in a group – spread out, keeping people several metres apart.
  • Don’t try to drive through flood waters.Floodwater may be deeper and faster flowing than it appears and often contains hidden dangersand debris. (Source: NSW SES Floodsafe)





DANGEROUS ANIMALS & PLANTS

Australia is home to a variety of native animals. Even if they seem friendly to you, do not touch or feed them – they are not used to close contact with humans and may hurt you. If you are visiting any of Australia’s beautiful parks or forests.

ANIMALS IN THEIR NATURAL HABITAT


Be wary of animals in their natural habitat. Stay well back from goannas, crocodiles, snakes, dingoes, cassowaries, and also wild pigs, cattle, horses and buffaloes. People have been seriously injured or killed by wild animals. Be very careful about approaching any injured animal, such as kangaroos or possums. They are likely to bite and scratch if you attempt to touch or move them.




NEVER FEED OR PLAY WITH WILDLIFE


Never feed or play with wildlife. Native animals are by nature timid; however, having been provided food from people, may become aggressive in pursuit of food. You may get bitten or scratched. In addition, human foods may be harmful to native animals.




TROPICAL QUEENSLAND


In the warm waters of Tropical Queensland:

  • Take care to avoid marine stingers.
  • Do not enter water where crocodiles may live.




BITES AND STINGS


The majority of insects in Australia are not harmful to humans. Some insects bite and sting if they are threatened so it is best to avoid touching them if you want to avoid being stung or bitten. The Australia-wide Poisons Information Centre’s have a common telephone number: 131 126. Some people are allergic to certain insect bites or venom. In the case of an allergic reaction to bites or stings, medical attention should be sought immediately. Call a doctor or hospital for guidance, or 000.




ANAPHYLAXIS - ALLERGIC REACTIONS


Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can occur in sensitive individuals from exposure to any chemicals foreign to the body, including bites and stings, plants, or medications. Parts of the body, for example the face or throat swell up so much that the patient can’t breathe. In severe cases the patient may go into shock within a few minutes and the heart can stop. For any patient who shows signs of anaphylaxis, call 000 for an ambulance, and have the patient taken immediately to the emergency department of the nearest hospital.




GENERAL FIRST AID FOR BITES AND STINGS


For bites or stings from these creatures seek first aid assistance straight away, stay calm, and as immobile as possible.

  • all species of Australian snakes, including sea snakes
  • funnel web spiders
  • blue ringed octopus
  • cone shell stings


For all other bites and stings:

  • Seek or apply basic first aid.
  • Wash with soap and water and apply an antiseptic if available
  • Ensure that the patient’s tetanus vaccination is up to date
  • Apply an ice-pack to reduce local pain and swelling
  • Pain relief may be required e.g. paracetamol or an antihistamine (to reduce swelling, redness and itch)
  • The patient should seek medical advice if they develop any other symptoms or signs of infection.
  • Poisons Info